Q: Hi Pablito again, about being prepared for anything, that's what dad trained me for, also sensei reminds his students of in every lesson, in fact now that I'm healed up (again, not 100%, but getting there) sensei wants me to demonstrate how the average person would fight against shotokan. I do have a question for you though, in a spar against sensei (he wasn't going all out), I managed to knock him off guard once, was that just a fluke or am I really improving? (I thought fluke)

samma-dan:

shaped-by-karate:

No Sensei is an indestructible superhero. Remember also that he wasn’t going all out and the purpose was to demonstrate.

One thing that separates a good student from a bad one is that the good student remains loyal and understands that the teacher is the teacher no matter what, and even if one day the student becomes more skilled than the teacher, he recognizes that the teacher is still the teacher, and respects him the same way as he did when he thought the teacher was indestructible.

A student who believes himself better than the teacher, just because he got a couple of hits in against the teacher in a sparing session, does not understand the Way.

I would consider it not only a success if (when) my students kick my ass, but I consider it my duty to help them to achieve this skill.

Yeah, but what I’m saying is that a good student wouldn’t let beating his teacher get in the way of his respect for his teacher. A good student wouldn’t boast or try to make himself “the master”, or fill up with pride over it.

In doing so, a student would demonstrate that he has not yet understood the Way of the Martial Arts.


asked by Anonymous

12 notes
Q: Hi Pablito again, about being prepared for anything, that's what dad trained me for, also sensei reminds his students of in every lesson, in fact now that I'm healed up (again, not 100%, but getting there) sensei wants me to demonstrate how the average person would fight against shotokan. I do have a question for you though, in a spar against sensei (he wasn't going all out), I managed to knock him off guard once, was that just a fluke or am I really improving? (I thought fluke)

No Sensei is an indestructible superhero. Remember also that he wasn’t going all out and the purpose was to demonstrate.

One thing that separates a good student from a bad one is that the good student remains loyal and understands that the teacher is the teacher no matter what, and even if one day the student becomes more skilled than the teacher, he recognizes that the teacher is still the teacher, and respects him the same way as he did when he thought the teacher was indestructible.

A student who believes himself better than the teacher, just because he got a couple of hits in against the teacher in a sparing session, does not understand the Way.


asked by Anonymous

12 notes
Q: Post 5 facts about yourself and then send this to 10 of your favorite followers

jetpack-johnny:

shaped-by-karate:

1. Black Belt (Some have asked me, so just clearing that up)

2. I teach at my Sensei’s dojo.

3. I have a personal student half way to being a black belt.

4. I’m actually pretty lazy.

5. I’m married. (For those of you who don’t know)

i did not know you were married lol

Haha, well there you go. =]


asked by becoming--batman

6 notes
Q: Post 5 facts about yourself and then send this to 10 of your favorite followers

1. Black Belt (Some have asked me, so just clearing that up)

2. I teach at my Sensei’s dojo.

3. I have a personal student half way to being a black belt.

4. I’m actually pretty lazy.

5. I’m married. (For those of you who don’t know)


asked by becoming--batman

6 notes
Q: Say 5 positive things about yourself and then, after posting them publicly, send this to 10 of your favorite followers (other than me, I've already done it). Go!:)

Positive things, hmm

Respectful

Reliable

Honest

Helpful

Self defense


asked by jetpack-johnny

0 notes
Personal Thoughts

My sentiment in all of this isn’t complete, but for the life of me, I can’t seem to find a way to put it all into words. Some things just can’t be taught, I guess.

As martial artists, we spend a lot of our time training sets of techniques that perfectly fit different scenarios.

Countless hours of repetition in order to acquire the reaction, speed and timing of an all too often imagined attack that will most likely never happen at all.

When faced with a situation against an opponent, for all of the training done and developed, most martial artists don’t count, or are not well prepared, on the point of randomness.

We don’t know what attack is coming, nor when it’s coming, since most times, attacks may come in the form of an ambush.

We don’t know the opponent’s timing, we don’t consider what if the opponent’s attack isn’t close enough, or to the side enough. We don’t consider what if our counterattack misses.

This training of specific sets of techniques, without development beyond the initial techniques, as it happens a lot with martial artists who don’t progress further from 2nd degree black belts (not that it cant happen beyond that), most often lead to one crucial, horrible mistake that can clearly define the lines between life, serious injury, and death… Hesitation.

When a martial artist gets used to their particular style’s set of techniques, and believes to have mastered the style merely for memorizing the techniques and a few of each technique’s variations, hesitation is the first thing that happens when an attack comes in a form different from the imagined situations practiced all of those countless of times.

A set of techniques does not dictate mastery of a style, much less mastery of the art of combat. In reality, and even more so today, there are no masters. The arts today are so vast in application, that we could spend a lifetime in dedication to the arts and still not fully understand how to fully apply everything that encompasses our arts. So in the end, the master is he who realizes that he’s nothing more than a student.

Knowledge is one thing, but understanding is another. To attain full understanding of the way, we must let go completely of self, and materialism, we must let go of life, and become void. Only then can we truly live. A feat that few have ever been able to accomplish.

However, if we can get to understand even just part of it all, and live by it, then we will have attained, in some small way, the right to call ourselves martial artists who follow the Way.

And in this way, reach the understanding that we will always be students of life.

12 notes
Q: Did you go to college? If so, what major?

theflobear:

shaped-by-karate:

Drafting Design with Auto-CAD, Auto-CAD 3-D, IT, and some Psychology. Never worked on any, though. I would love to get back to studying Psychology if I get the chance, though.

myonetwo

i’m doing industrial design. I’m going to learn how to use CAD next year and do artsy-designy things with it and modeling/drafting basically. not as much science/programming

Nice! =]


asked by myonetwo

8 notes
Q: Did you go to college? If so, what major?

Drafting Design with Auto-CAD, Auto-CAD 3-D, IT, and some Psychology. Never worked on any, though. I would love to get back to studying Psychology if I get the chance, though.

myonetwo


asked by myonetwo

8 notes
Q: Hi, Pablito again, I'm doing much better, sensei is noting major improvements since I'm healed up (Not 100%, but getting there), as for me, I'm learning all aspects of shotokan, including dodging and evasion (admittedly harder for me with my bulk, but learning nonetheless), also I proposed something for bunkai (after class) because I grapple better than strike, and sensei was pleased about my thinking in shotokan, but has to test the efficacy in randori.

That’s great, sounds like everything is good and the learning is on, I’m glad. Keep it up, Pablito! =]


asked by Anonymous

0 notes
Q: Have you seen the new captain america movie yet and if you have did you like it?

Oh man, no, I have not. But when I do, I’ll let you know. =]


asked by shotokanandscience

1 note