Q: what are your thoughts on jkd?

It’s philosophy and application theory is great, but I believe that the art as a whole died with it’s founder.


asked by Anonymous

3 notes
Miyamoto Musashi's 21 Precepts

shaped-by-karate:

1. Accept everything just the way it is.

2. Do not seek pleasure for it’s own sake.

3. Do not, under any circumstances, depend on a partial feeling.

4. Think lightly of yourself and deeply of the world.

5. Be detached from desire your whole life.

6. Do not regret what you have done.

7. Never…

164 notes
Q: Hi Pablito again, about being prepared for anything, that's what dad trained me for, also sensei reminds his students of in every lesson, in fact now that I'm healed up (again, not 100%, but getting there) sensei wants me to demonstrate how the average person would fight against shotokan. I do have a question for you though, in a spar against sensei (he wasn't going all out), I managed to knock him off guard once, was that just a fluke or am I really improving? (I thought fluke)

samma-dan:

ulfric42:

shaped-by-karate:

samma-dan:

shaped-by-karate:

No Sensei is an indestructible superhero. Remember also that he wasn’t going all out and the purpose was to demonstrate.

One thing that separates a good student from a bad one is that the good student remains loyal and understands that the teacher is the teacher no matter what, and even if one day the student becomes more skilled than the teacher, he recognizes that the teacher is still the teacher, and respects him the same way as he did when he thought the teacher was indestructible.

A student who believes himself better than the teacher, just because he got a couple of hits in against the teacher in a sparing session, does not understand the Way.

I would consider it not only a success if (when) my students kick my ass, but I consider it my duty to help them to achieve this skill.

Yeah, but what I’m saying is that a good student wouldn’t let beating his teacher get in the way of his respect for his teacher. A good student wouldn’t boast or try to make himself “the master”, or fill up with pride over it.

In doing so, a student would demonstrate that he has not yet understood the Way of the Martial Art

Truth.

This is important. On many different levels.
The interesting thing is that unlike modern times in past demonstrations that I have seen it is the student that is performing the application on the master. Not the master effortlessly demonstrating the application on the matter. It is somewhat beautiful to watch an old master like Yee Ling-arn be thrown around by some of his senior students for demonstration purposes.
For if the master presents themselves as an infailable and indestructible individual that cannot be beaten their ego investment is huge. Often to the detriment of the student who is looking to learn.
In my experience with push hands and light sparring is that the best people to learn and work with are those that do not have a lot of ego investment. Those people that will not worry if they are struck out knocked down. This is a training environment, not a death match. Even better are those that will present openings for you to perceive and try to take advantage of. Granted, in some of those cases it is an attempt to goad one in. But that is another matter.

Well said.

True


asked by Anonymous

14 notes
Hey…

Sorry I haven’t been around much this past week, guys. I’ve been pretty busy with some personal stuff, but I’ll be back to blogging in the next couple of days.

Leave me questions, comments, anything at all. Just because I haven’t been posting much, doesn’t mean I can’t interact with you, guys, so don’t hesitate if you need anything. =]

3 notes
Q: What is your favorite martial art and how do you compare it to other martial arts

Ishindo Zen Kempo. More dedicated to the art and focuses on self defense, rather than on competition. It also teaches you to be an individual in a group, instead of just one more copy. Each of us has our own Ishindo Zen Kempo, for each of us has our own path. This philosophy, among other things, makes this particular martial art, my preferred path.

There’s nothing to compare, really. Every style has their strengths and weaknesses, but they all have their practicality. In the end, it’s the individuals dedication to the training that determines if his art is good, through him/herself.


asked by karatelol2

6 notes
Q: Pablito again, I meant no disrespect to you, sensei or shotokan, like I said I thought it was a fluke that I threw him off guard (once), do I think I'm better than him, no (otherwise, I wouldn't be taking lessons from him). Do I think I can kick his ass, HELL NO, I think he could kill me six ways from Sunday if he tried, is he infallible, NO, that's why we all die sooner or later, but I'm always happy to learn something new from him or in general, I apologize if I sounded arrogant.

Oh no, no, don’t worry about it. What I wrote wasn’t directed at you, my friend. Just touching on points that go with your comment, for everyone in general. =]


asked by Anonymous

1 note
Q: Hi Pablito again, about being prepared for anything, that's what dad trained me for, also sensei reminds his students of in every lesson, in fact now that I'm healed up (again, not 100%, but getting there) sensei wants me to demonstrate how the average person would fight against shotokan. I do have a question for you though, in a spar against sensei (he wasn't going all out), I managed to knock him off guard once, was that just a fluke or am I really improving? (I thought fluke)

samma-dan:

shaped-by-karate:

No Sensei is an indestructible superhero. Remember also that he wasn’t going all out and the purpose was to demonstrate.

One thing that separates a good student from a bad one is that the good student remains loyal and understands that the teacher is the teacher no matter what, and even if one day the student becomes more skilled than the teacher, he recognizes that the teacher is still the teacher, and respects him the same way as he did when he thought the teacher was indestructible.

A student who believes himself better than the teacher, just because he got a couple of hits in against the teacher in a sparing session, does not understand the Way.

I would consider it not only a success if (when) my students kick my ass, but I consider it my duty to help them to achieve this skill.

Yeah, but what I’m saying is that a good student wouldn’t let beating his teacher get in the way of his respect for his teacher. A good student wouldn’t boast or try to make himself “the master”, or fill up with pride over it.

In doing so, a student would demonstrate that he has not yet understood the Way of the Martial Arts.


asked by Anonymous

14 notes
Q: Hi Pablito again, about being prepared for anything, that's what dad trained me for, also sensei reminds his students of in every lesson, in fact now that I'm healed up (again, not 100%, but getting there) sensei wants me to demonstrate how the average person would fight against shotokan. I do have a question for you though, in a spar against sensei (he wasn't going all out), I managed to knock him off guard once, was that just a fluke or am I really improving? (I thought fluke)

No Sensei is an indestructible superhero. Remember also that he wasn’t going all out and the purpose was to demonstrate.

One thing that separates a good student from a bad one is that the good student remains loyal and understands that the teacher is the teacher no matter what, and even if one day the student becomes more skilled than the teacher, he recognizes that the teacher is still the teacher, and respects him the same way as he did when he thought the teacher was indestructible.

A student who believes himself better than the teacher, just because he got a couple of hits in against the teacher in a sparing session, does not understand the Way.


asked by Anonymous

14 notes